Key Quotes - Education

Key Quotes - Education

A world perspective in bite-size chunks
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Last update: Tuesday 20th August
 
Sexual abuse allegations have been made involving as many as 100 victims at five of Britain's leading music schools, it emerged yesterday. Ian Pace, a well known musician and former pupil at Chetham's School of Music in Manchester, said he had heard of accusations concerning his alma mater as well as the Purcell School in Herts, Wells Cathedral School in Somerset, St Mary's Music School in Edinburgh and the Yehudi Menuhin School in Surrey. Many more claims concerned psychological and emotional abuse. The pianist, who has been campaigning for a government-led inquiry into the alleged culture of sexual abuse at music schools and colleges, said he and others had handed the names of all the alleged perpetrators to police. Officers cannot begin an investigation unless a specific formal complaint is made. A "significant" police inquiry is under way in Manchester, where about 10 teachers at Ghetham's and the Royal Northern College of Music are being investigated over allegations of rape and serious sexual assault.
EducationDaily Telegraph 09.05.2013
 
Traditional GCSE grades should be scrapped because the system fails to differentiate properly between bright and weak pupils, Cambridge University's exam board has warned. The existing eight-grade scale - from A* to G - should be abolished as part of a government overhaul of exams for 16-year-olds, it was claimed. Cambridge Assessment said that grades should be replaced by a points-based system in which pupils are awarded scores between zero and 900 depending on their performance in tests. The change, outlined in a policy paper, would prevent two students achieving exam marks "some distance apart" yet receiving the same grade, examiners explained.
EducationDaily Telegraph 09.05.2013
 
Universities in the UK are lagging behind those in other countries because of a lack of investment in higher education, an international study has found. The UK was ranked 10th in the world despite boasting some of the best research institutions, such as Oxford and Cambridge. According to researchers, Britain was outperformed by other nations including America, Sweden, Switzerland, Denmark, Finland and the Netherlands in an assessment of the overall effectiveness of the higher education system. UK universities were named among the best in the world on a pound-for-pound basis — measuring research output and the production of a skilled workforce needed to meet the needs of industry. But the study by Universitas 21, an international network of universities and colleges, found that the nation slipped dramatically when assessed by the amount of public and private investment in universities.
EducationDaily Telegraph 09.05.2013
 
A quarter of applications to set up free schools in England over the past two years were from faith-based organisations, official data shows. This compares to a third of state schools which have a faith designation. Church of England, Catholic, Muslim, Sikh and Jewish groups were among 132 faith applicants under the scheme. The data was published after the Department for Education lost a bid to withhold it and was ordered by the Information Commissioner to release it. As he released the data, Education Secretary Michael Gove said he wanted to be ‘careful’ about the information published on free schools applications. The material now published by the Department for Education (DfE) gives details of free school proposals published under the first three rounds of applications.
EducationThe Sentinel, February 21, 2013
 
The head of Ofsted has criticised teachers who attempt to "pull the wool" over inspectors' eyes by laying on "frenetic" lessons to impress them. Sir Michael Wilshaw said teachers should not "put on a show" when they were being scrutinised. Such behaviour was likely to backfire, he hinted, as inspectors found it "deeply irritating". It was also "confusing" for pupils.
EducationDaily Telegraph 16 March 2013
 
Primary schools are to receive more than £100 million of funding for intensive sports teaching. The funding deal, to be unveiled in the coming days by David Cameron, will effectively guarantee that children will continue to have access to specialist sports teaching at least once a week. Competitive sports will form the centrepiece of the lessons. Every primary school is to be given a sports grant that is based on its number of pupils….The funding is being provided from across government with the education, health and sport departments all contributing. It is seen as a key part of the London 2012 Olympic legacy and Lord Coe, who was chairman of the Games' organising committee, is understood to have been involved closely in drawing up the plans.
EducationDaily Telegraph 13 March 2013
 
“Some children are coming to school with cold chips or just a packet of biscuits in their lunchbox, experts say. A survey of 250 school, youth and health staff working with children suggests many go without enough to eat during the school day. The Children’s Food Trust’s poll found 68.1 percent had seen a rise in the proportion of families struggling to feed their children in the past two years. Lunchboxes contain less fruit and more junk food. Of the staff working in schools, 47.5 percent said they had seen a change in the food in children’s lunchboxes as household budgets got tighter. One staff member said they had seen ‘poorer quality sandwich fillings, sometimes just margarine’. Another said there were ‘fewer processed items – more leftovers or store-cupboard items’.
EducationThe Sentinel – 26th February 2013
 
More than one in three young people in the UK are put off post-secondary training or education because of the perceived cost, a report has found. Young people in this country were far more likely to say that they were not interested in further education than respondents from other countries, according to an international report by Mckinsey and Company.
EducationYouthwork, February 2013
 
There is widespread support in England for teaching Christianity in schools, a You Gov poll revealed in November. Almost two-thirds (64%) of just over 1,800 people questioned in May 2012 said that children need to learn about Christianity to understand English history, while more than half (57%) said it was important if pupils are to understand the English culture and way of life.
EducationEvangelicals Now, January 2013
 
A recent survey by Kellogg’s found that four out of five teachers see children going to school without having eaten any breakfast. Thought to be caused primarily by parental apathy and a lack of money, it had led to concern from teachers that this could cause wavering concentration and bad behaviour. Some teachers have even taken to bringing in their own food to give to hungry children.
EducationChildrenswork, December 2012/January 2013
 
A school which gave out iPads to every pupil in hope of improving their education has admitted that just a year later half the costly devices have been broken. Honywood Community Science School dished out iPad2 tablets to its 1,200 pupils a year ago, at vast cost to the taxpayer. Despite warnings that children would not be able to look after the fragile computer tablet, the school in Goggeshall, Essex, allowed children to take the device outside the classroom, playground and street and home at evenings and weekends. It was hoped that the iPads would be a useful learning tool, as well as keep the school up to pace with inter¬national competitors embracing the technology in the classroom. But after just one year, more than four in ten of the iPads had been sent off for repair, after being knocked, dropped or scratched. Figures obtained under the Freedom of Information Act reveal 489 had to be replaced after being found to be beyond repair.
EducationDaily Mail Jan 1 2013
 
Winston Churchill, Admiral Lord Nelson and Oliver Cromwell are to be returned to the history curriculum to ensure children have a solid grasp of Britain's past. Schools will also be required to teach more facts and events to ensure children develop what Michael Gove, the Education Secretary, has called a "connected narrative" of history. The key figures were among those dropped from the history curriculum by Labour in 2007, which wanted to give schools more flexibility about what to teach….Labour's history curriculum has been attacked from the Right for being driven by political correctness while some teaching it have also criticised its emphasis on teaching skills, saying it has failed to give children the bare bones of a historical education.
EducationThe Daily Telegraph Dec 31 2012
 
More than 100 independent faith schools may be radicalising students, the Department for Education has warned in a secret memo which admits that officials are struggling to tackle extremism in state and private schools. Behind closed doors there are concerns about 118 "socially conservative" independent faith schools - the vast majority of them Muslim - where pupils may be encouraged to cut themselves off from mainstream society. Ministers have been told they do not have "detailed information" about the religious orientation of the groups behind all independent faith schools. Officials have also privately admitted that they also have no system to identify institutional extremism in state schools, The Daily Telegraph has learnt.
EducationThe Daily Telegraph Dec 31 2012
 
Thousands of student places were left empty at elite Russell Group universities this year because of the Government's higher education reforms, a vice-chancellor has admitted. Leading institutions started the academic year with about 11,500 vacancies following an overhaul of admissions rules. Prof Sir Howard Newby, the vice-chancellor of Liverpool University, said the unfilled places were an "unintended consequence" of the changes and warned that the same situation could arise in 2013. It has already been disclosed that universities suffered a dip in admissions rates this year, but Sir Howard's comments are believed to be the first acknowledgement of the serious problems faced by some of the country's most sought-after universities.
EducationThe Daily Telegraph November 23 2012
 
Private schools should not be expected to open up their facilities to pupils from local state schools, a leading headmistress said yesterday. Louise Robinson, president of the Girls' Schools Association, said it was 'beyond the pale' for the Government to insist that private schools share their 'unique selling points', such as facilities and resources, with the 'competition'. She said that middle class parents who manage to find the money for private school fees should not be expected to bankroll state pupils who want to use the same resources. Her comments are likely to spark fierce debate among private school heads, many of whom justify their schools' 'charitable' status by stressing the ways in which they share facilities with local state schools and the community. David Cameron and Education Secretary Michael Gove have praised this practice and urged independent schools to go further, pooling their 'DNA' with state schools by extending financial backing and lending their 'brands' to academies.
EducationDaily Mail November 20 2012
 
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