Key Quotes - Education

Key Quotes - Education

A world perspective in bite-size chunks
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Last update: Friday 23rd August
 
A wave of 2000 new summer schools will put 65000 disadvantaged children in an ‘equal footing’ with their peers Nick Clegg said today. The Deputy Prime Minister who announced plans for the two-week ‘brain training’ camps across England last year said the initiative would allow struggling pupils leaving primary school to ‘get to grips’ with life at secondary level.
EducationThe Sentinel – 23rd July 2012
 
Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg has reacted angrily to Michael Gove’s plan to scrap GCSE’s in England, saying they would create a ‘two-tier system’. Mr Clegg said the Education Secretary’s proposal was ‘self-evidently not policy that has been discussed and agreed within the coalition’. Mr Gove wants to bring back a system similar to the O-levels with CSE’s for less able pupils. He later told MP’s the current system was letting children down.
EducationThe Sentinel – 22nd June 2012
 
Children who struggle in the three Rs at a young age will be clearly identified as part of a significant overhaul of the primary school curriculum, it has emerged. A shake-up of assessments for five to 11 year-olds would ensure schools are "identifying those who are falling below national expectations", the Government said. The existing system, which places pupils in different "levels" during primary education, will be scrapped. For the first time, the new approach may lead to pupils being assigned a "pass" or "fail" at the end of each year. In formal end-of-primary Sats exams, chil¬dren may be given GCSE-style grades. Teaching unions warned that the reforms failed to take account of the different speeds at which young children develop, with fears that summer-born pupils could be left behind.
EducationThe Daily Telegraph June 12 2012
 
Small specialist colleges will be given new powers to become universities in the biggest expansion of higher education in 20 years, it was disclosed yesterday. Institutions with just 1,000 students - including 750 taking degree courses - will be able to win the right to full university status under new plans, the Government announced. Previously, colleges could only apply for the title if they had at least 4,000 students, with 3,000 taking degrees.
EducationThe Daily Telegraph June 12 2012
 
Tens of thousands of teachers will be forced back to the classroom to study grammar and maths because they lack the knowledge to deliver tough new primary school lessons. Ministers yesterday unveiled an overhaul of England's 'substandard' primary curriculum in an attempt to reverse more than a decade of dumbing down. English lessons will contain tougher grammar and spelling, while maths classes will put greater emphasis on times tables, fractions, mental arithmetic and long division. But experts warn many teachers will need intensive retraining to deliver the new lessons. A requirement on schools to teach a foreign language to all seven to 11-year-olds will entail even more extra lessons. Under a proposed new curriculum for English, pupils as young as seven will be introduced to conjunctions, prepositions, adverbs and subordinate clauses.
EducationThe Daily Mail June 12 2012
 
A £1 billion programme of British aid for education in three east African countries has failed to teach basic reading, writing and maths skills to most of the children involved, an independent report found today. It warned that ‘inadequate attention’ was paid to the quality of education provided by the schemes in Rwanda, Ethiopia and Tanzania and urged the Department for International Development to revise its strategy.
EducationThe Sentinel – 18th May 2012
 
Government plans to test 11 year olds on spelling and grammar drew fierce criticism from school leaders yesterday, who warned the move is a waste of tax-payers money. The National Association of Head Teachers raised the prospect of a boycott as they voted to explore ways of making sure the exam does not take place. From next year, pupils in the final year of primary school will sit an externally-marked spelling, punctuation and grammar paper.
EducationThe Sentinel – 7th May 2012
 
GCSEs and A-levels in key subjects have become easier following a 10-year dumb¬ing down of exam papers, according to the standards watchdog. Ofqual said that changes made to tests over the past decade had "reduced the demand" of qualifications taken by hun¬dreds of thousands of schoolchildren. In a series of reports, it emerged that teenagers were facing more multiple-choice exams and short, structured ques¬tions that prevented bright pupils from displaying their knowledge. Many exams had been stripped of core academic content, with students required to study less of the syllabus to pass.
EducationThe Daily Telegraph May 2 2012
 
Teachers won millions of pounds in compensation last year after accidents, injuries, assaults and discrimination at school new figures show. In one case, a teacher was awarded more than £222,000 after suffering a brain injury when a pupil hit her on the head with a bus door. Another was handed almost £175,000 after being punched in the head by the parent of a pupil. Others were given settlements of thousands of pounds after tripping or slipping at school, the figures show.
EducationThe Sentinel – 6th April 2012
 
The Government has declined a request from the Religious Education Council of England and Wales (REC) for a significant review of RE alongside the current National Curriculum review, it has emerged. The council, which is concerned that RE is being marginalised by its exclusion from the EBacc and other government decisions, made its proposal in a letter at the end of October. The refusal was refused late in January in a response from Schools Minister, Nick Gibb.
EducationThe Church Times – March 2012
 
Church of England Schools face the challenge of maintaining their ‘distinctive’ Christian character says a report by the church. The Church School of the Future recommends that church schools should strongly assert their Christian ethos in an increasingly fragmented educational system and amid attacks from secularists. The report argues: “High quality religious education and collective worship should continue to make contributions to the church schools ethos.” Dioceses, school leaders, politicians and other stakeholders with an interest in education, contributed evidence to the report, which was launched at a conference at Lambeth Palace.
EducationThe War Cry – March 2012
 
Schools which fail to teach pupils to read and write should be fined, an independent panel investigating the causes of last year’s riots said today. About a fifth of school leavers have the literacy skills of an 11-year-old or younger, leaving many with no stake in society, and no reason to stay out of trouble, the Riots, Communities and Victims Panel said. The report added “Every child should be able to read and write, if they cannot, the school should face a financial penalty equivalent to the cost of funding remedial support to take the child to the appropriate standard.
EducationThe Sentinel – 28th March 2012
 
More than a third of the Government's academies are overhauling the school year and reducing the long summer holiday, according to research. In an attempt to raise standards, 36 per cent of schools have altered, or are planning to alter, the academic year, a study by the think tank Reform found. One academy has cut the summer break from six to three weeks. Others are to impose four-week breaks. The changes enable schools to introduce more regular term dates and give pupils longer half-term holidays. Around 17 per cent of the schools have also lengthened, or plan to lengthen, the school day, the study found.
EducationThe Daily Telegraph - March 28 2012
 
Trainee teachers face having to sit higher tests in literacy and in numeracy before being allowed to enter the classroom following concern about poor standards in the three Rs. Students will be required to pass rigorous exams to qualify for training places as part of reforms designed to attract the brightest graduates into the profession. An expert panel, led by top head teachers, will draw up new assessments of basic skills in an effort to root out poorly qualified candidates. Ministers have also proposed raising the pass mark for existing tests and cutting the number of times students can re-sit exams.
EducationThe Daily Telegraph - March 28 2012
 
Oxford University is admitting more teenagers from poor performing state schools and deprived backgrounds amid government pressure to create a more diverse student body, it has emerged. New figures show a 75 per cent increase in offers made to disadvantaged students who were fast-tracked for interview this year. It follows a series of high-profile attacks by the Coalition on the most selective universities. Last year, Nick Clegg accused Oxford and Cambridge of being effectively biased against poor pupils, saying they had to ensure "British society is better reflected" in their admissions to justify state funding.
EducationThe Daily Telegraph - March 28 2012
 
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