Key Quotes - Education

Key Quotes - Education

A world perspective in bite-size chunks
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Last update: Sunday 25th August
 
Regulations coming into force in England this week require parents to keep pupils under supervision for the first five days of an exclusion. Following this “home detention” local authorities will have to provide pupils with lessons from the sixth day of an exclusion from their own school. Last year there were an average of 1,700 pupils excluded each school day. Schools Secretary, Ed Balls has written to head teachers emphasising the importance of improving behaviour. Parents will face fines if they do not supervise children who have been excluded.
EducationThe Sentinel - 4th September 2007
 
Teenagers who have achieved five good GCSEs can expect to earn an extra £2,260 per year when they start work, according to research which has been published. But one in five employers would not recruit an applicant who lacks five GCSEs with a grade of C or better, the Learning and Skills Council said.
EducationThe Sentinel - August 24th 2007
 
A record one in four A-level exams resulted in an A grade this year, as the pass rate rose for the 25th year in a row. For the first time ever more than a quarter of exams were given A grades. Stephen Williams, Liberal Democrat education spokesman, responded to the record results with a renewed call for a review of A-level standards, amid fears of dumbing down. But Jim Knight, the schools minister, said it was ‘a real shame’ that once again critics were undermining the hard work of students. A review of A-level standards was carried out three years ago.
EducationSalvationist - 25th August 2007
 
Pupils from poor families who struggle in class should be forced to go to school at weekends and during holidays as part of a drive to raise standards, a report said today. A voucher style “pupil premium” should be introduced giving extra government funding to educating children from the poorest homes, the study by the Centre Forum think-tank proposed.
EducationThe Sentinel - July 17 2007
 
Poor white boys are not only the majority of persistent low achievers in schools, but do worse than children of similar income levels from other ethnic groups, according to a new Joseph Rowntree Foundation study. If white children do less well at primary school, they are more likely than any other ethnic group to remain low achievers throughout their education. In 2006 nearly 5% of all pupils in state schools (28,000) received no GCSE passes and almost 25% (146,000) scored no passes above the ‘D’grade. Findings show that the chief characteristic of low achievers is that they come from disadvantaged backgrounds.
EducationYouthwork - August 2007
 
White working-class boys are the biggest under-achievers at school. Only 17 per cent get 5 or more GCSE’s at grades A to C, compared with a national average of 56 per cent. The figure for black Caribbean boys is 19 per cent. The report proposes ‘pioneer schools’ in areas where existing schools are failing.
EducationSalvationist (The Daily Express) - 21 July 2007
 
Ofsted has said that RE teaching in schools could be better and that a national curriculum for religious education may be required for English schools. The five-year study, entitled Making Sense of Religion, said that the significance of religion in the modern world was not effectively taught in secondary schools. It said “Work of specific aspects of Christianity, such as the life of Jesus or the Bible, is isolated from an investigation of the religion itself.”
EducationChurch of Englandb - June 22 2007
 
Teachers should avoid asking pupils to put their hands up to answer a question in a bid to stop quiet children falling behind, according to Government advice. Research identified a group of youngsters who struggle to keep up with their classmates between the ages of seven and 11, despite doing well in previous years. Ministers today published a report advising schools how to help these so-called “invisible children”, who often try to avoid drawing attention to themselves during lessons. Their work is neat and they are generally well behaved but children “in the comfort zone” need a different approach from teachers to help them make progress, the report found.
The report found that it is often boys who fall behind in English at primary school, while girls were more likely to be found among those struggling to make progress in maths. Teachers felt that children suffered because parents stopped helping with homework when maths, in particular, was becoming too complicated. The Government recommended a range of strategies which teachers could use in the classroom to help these children.
The methods included choosing which child to question in class instead of inviting all the pupils to put up their hands if they know the answer. Children could also be given 30 seconds “thinking time” before being asked to answer or told to discuss questions in pairs before answering, the Department for Education said. Later, the DfES said about 37,000 pupils were thought to be making slow progress in English at primary school, while 75,000 pupils were falling behind in mathematics.

EducationThe Sentinel, Friday June 1, 2007
 
New guidance on school uniforms issued by government minsters will enable schools to ban pupils from wearing full-face veils on security, safety or learning grounds. The guidelines follow a series of legal cases where schools were sued for excluding pupils who wore religious dress.
EducationEvangelical Times – May 2007
 
Some 65,000 adults across the country feel a lack of maths, English or IT skills is holding them back.

EducationThe Sentinel – 4th December 2006
 
Nearly a million children in England attend schools that provide a poor standard of education, according to a group of influential MPs.

EducationThe Sentinel – 17th October 2006
 
Two new surveys blame religion for rising violence in the world, and highlights concerns about faith schools.

EducationEvangelicals Now – November 2006
 
Since 2003 the number of sixth formers taking Religious Studies at A level has increased by more than 40%. This represents more than 18,000 candidates who took the exam, and around a quarter were awarded A grades.

EducationProtestant Truth – November / December 2006
 
Four out of ten students do not believe A-levels prepare them for the demands of a university degree, college leaders have claimed. More than half the undergraduates surveyed said their teachers steered them toward courses which the school did well, rather than subjects which matched their needs.

EducationThe Sentinel – 2nd October 2006
 
Four out of ten students do not believe A-levels prepare them for the demands of a university degree, college leaders have claimed. More than half the undergraduates surveyed said their teachers steered them toward courses which the school did well, rather than subjects which matched their needs.

EducationThe Sentinel – 2nd October 2006
 
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