Key Quotes - Family

Key Quotes - Family

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Last update: Saturday 20th July
 
A senior Tory peer has been accused of undermining marriage after remarking that it is not necessarily "important" for couples to be faithful. Baroness Stowell, who speaks for the Conservatives in the Lords on equalities issues, said it was "open to each couple" to decide whether it was necessary to be faithful to each other. Her comments came as she defended the Government's decision to omit provisions for divorce on grounds of adultery from same-sex marriage legislation. She insisted that it was not up to the law to enforce marital fidelity and that people should decide "within their own relationship" whether cheating matters.
FamilyDaily Telegraph June 21 2013
 
Five million families are approaching financial “breaking point” and are relying on loans and savings to cover their food bills, research has suggested. One in five households said that their monthly incomes would not stretch to cover all of their food costs in April and they had to use some form of borrowing such as a credit card, and over draft or a loan. This would equate to five million families if the findings were projected across the UK, Which? said.
FamilyThe Sentinel – May 6, 2013
 
Children as old as five are going to school in nappies because they have not been toilet trained, a study has revealed. Parents are failing to pass on basic skills to their children, such as recognising when they have a full bladder. As a result teachers are increasingly helping youngsters who have had 'accidents', instead of teaching classes. A teachers' union yesterday blamed the problem on mothers and fathers who 'lack parenting skills'. Details emerged from a survey of 18 primary schools, which found 24 children did not know how to use the toilet and still wore nappies. One school reported having to replace the carpet in two classrooms because children had not got to the toilet in time.
FamilyDaily Mail 09.05.2013
 
The trend for having children later in life means one million parents will still be supporting their offspring after they retire, according to research. Whereas 20 years ago it was unusual to have children after the age of 40, the study concluded that the modern "cut-off ages for men and women becoming parents were 49 and 43 respectively. But embarking on parenthood later means many people face working longer or dipping into their pension to support their children. The study also suggests that the average retirement savings currently fall more than £2,000 short of the average annual cost of raising a child.
FamilyDaily Telegraph April 10 2013
 
Politicians are too frightened to admit family breakdown is causing major damage, a senior family lawyer said in late February. Baroness Deech said that, when it comes to the absence of fathers in families, there is ‘a conspiracy of silence. Politicians fear to address it, for they themselves or their constituents may be implicated’. The shadow public health minister Diane Abbott has said that family breakdown causes society’s biggest health issues.
FamilyEvangelicals Now, April 2013
 
There are a staggering 3.6 million children living in poverty in Britain today – that’s 27 per cent of all children. In some areas that figure can be as high as 70 per cent. Children are living in some unimaginable conditions, watching their parents suffer from alcoholism, going through family breakdown, and being subject to poor parenting. And child poverty is expected to have risen in 2012-13, with 300,000 more children expected to be living in poverty in 2015-16, according to the Child Poverty Action Group.
FamilyIdea, Mar/Apr 2013
 
As if holding down a full-time job isn't enough, working mothers do a 28-hour week at home looking after the children, a study has found. It means they put in a shift of more than 13 hours every weekday - and weekends are hardly chore-free either. Caring for the children and managing the home sees the average working mother's day begin at 6.45am. It does not end until 7.52pm, when the children go to bed. The near 66-hour week means that three quarters of mothers rarely get a chance to sit down to eat breakfast or dinner. So it is no surprise that 92 per cent believe being a mother is a full-time job in itself. The study of 2,000 mothers for natural cold remedy Kaloba found that in an average week more than eight-and-a-half hours is spent dressing and entertaining the children while almost five hours is taken up with cooking. Three hours 38 minutes is spent on household chores and more than two hours on food shopping. One hour 25 minutes is taken up helping the children with their homework and almost as long ferrying them around. On top of this, 40 per cent of mothers hold down a full-time job, adding another 37 and a half hours.
FamilyDaily Mail 18 March 2013
 
Millions of families will be no better off in 2015 than they were in 2000 due to a devastating attack on household finances, according to Britain's leading think tank. The average worker will have suffered the worst squeeze on incomes in memory by the time of the next General Election, warns the Institute for Fiscal Studies…There are record numbers in work in Brit¬ain, with nearly 30million in employment even despite the mounting risk of a triple-dip recession. But workers' real pay – what they earn after inflation - is plummeting as families around the country are hammered by paltry pay rises, soaring household bills and inflation, tax hikes and benefit cuts.
FamilyDaily Mail 14 March 2013
 
In every US state, the proportion of families where children have two parents rather than one has dropped significantly over the past decade, according to a January 2 report. The number of two-parent households decreased by 1.2 million. 15 million children in the USA, or one in three, currently live without a father, compared to 1960, when just 11% of American children lived in homes without fathers.
FamilyEvangelicals Now, February 2013
 
A report released by national charity 4Children says there is a ‘silent epidemic of drinking among British families’. ‘Over the Limit: The Truth about Families and Alcohol’ also says that many parents remain oblivious to the negative effects that alcohol can have on their parenting. It revealed that only 9 per cent of parents recognise that drinking or drug use has a negative effect on family life. Nineteen per cent said alcohol had a positive effect on their ability to parent. The report also indicated that the wealthiest parents drank the most heavily. Households with the highest incomes were four times more likely to drink daily compared to the poorest households.
FamilyChildrenswork, December 2012/January 2013
 
Parents are regularly helping to pay their grown-up children’s basic living costs including bills and rent according to research by insurance company LV=. Research among British parents found that on average they were contributing £2103 a year or £175 a month for each child towards such expenses. On top of those costs, parents are spending an additional £9476 on average per child on expensive items and events over the course of their adult lifetimes such as first houses, further education, holidays and weddings.
FamilyThe War Cry – September 2012
 
Social workers are to check that parents teach children "moral values" and "conscience" as part of an overhaul of child protection rules unveiled today. A failure to instil a basic sense of right and wrong in children is to be recognised as a sign of poor parenting in official guidelines for the first time. Ministers are preparing to replace more than 700 pages of "pointless" child protection guidance with a much smaller document, in an attempt to free social workers from "tick-box" rules. Several targets and national guidelines are to be abolished which, it is hoped, will also allow doctors, police and other professionals to do their jobs more easily.
FamilyThe Daily Telegraph June 12 2012
 
The annual number of new applications to take children into care has passed the 10,000 mark for the first time, latest figures show. Councils in England launched 886 legal proceedings to remove at-risk youngsters from their families in March, taking the 12 month total to 10,199. Caffcass, the agency that looks after children’s interests in the family courts, said the figures showed that agencies were working more quickly following the impact of the Baby P tragedy.
FamilyThe Sentinel – 12th April 2012
 
Sending young children to nursery schools can harm their development, new research from Canada has suggested. The "lion's share" of children attending state nurseries at a young age had lower test scores in later life compared with those who stayed home with a parent. Boys at nursery were the worst affected, displaying higher levels of aggression and hyperactivity. A study by Michael Kottelenberg and Steven Lehrer, economists from Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, examined the introduction of universal subsidised child care in Quebec. Their findings were attributed to a sharp reduction in the amount of time children spent with their parents, being read to or playing.
FamilyThe Daily Telegraph - March 28 2012
 
In February, Mayor of London Boris Johnson backed the right of parents to smack their children. He told BBC Radio 5 Live that he believed the current law was ‘confusing’ and warned that parents were ‘anxious’ about disciplining their children. The law on smacking in England and Wales allows parents to smack their children, but legislation in 2004 restricted the defence of ‘reasonable chastisement’.
FamilyEvangelicals Now - March 2012
 
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