Scott Farrell - Orgue Heroique

Published Wednesday 10th January 2018
Scott Farrell - Orgue Heroique
Scott Farrell - Orgue Heroique

STYLE: Classical
RATING 6 6 6 6 6 6
OUR PRODUCT CODE: 168399-26436
LABEL: Regent REGCD507
FORMAT: CD Album
ITEMS: 1

This product is currently not available from Cross Rhythms Direct


Reviewed by Steven Whitehead

We have reviewed CDs featuring Scott Farrell as an accompanist, mainly from his previous position as Organist and Master of the Music at the Cathedral Church of St Nicholas, Newcastle-upon-Tyne from where he also contributed Volume VIII of Regent's English Cathedral series. In 2008 he moved south to Rochester where he is responsible for all music in the cathedral as Director of Music and Organist. This recital showcases the full range of colour and dynamics of the instrument, the oldest pipes of which date back to an organ built by Samuel Green in 1791. Since then the instrument has had an interesting history, succinctly explained in the CD booklet. In 2016 the organ was enhanced with new Swell reeds and this recording is the first to include them. The programme opens with the dramatic "Mars, The Bringer Of War" from 'The Planets' by Gustav Holst as transcribed by Arthur Willis. This really is a show-stopper but perhaps having it first sets expectations that the rest of the programme cannot quite meet. "Come Sweetest Death, Come Blessed Rest" by Johann Sebastian Bach and arranged by Virgil Fox is a lovely tune but lacks the drama of "Mars" and I could say the same of much of the content until we reach "Nimrod" from Edward Elgar's 'Enigma Variations', here arranged by William Harris. If we stopped here we would finish on a high but, for me, the concluding "Sonata Eroica" by Joseph Jongen which lasts 16 minutes became a drag. Perhaps as a listener I need material with which I am familiar so I can get my bearings and possibly with repeated plays I would grow to appreciate more of the content. Certainly Scott Farrell plays well and the quality of the recording is beyond criticism so collectors of organ music will get more from this than I did.

The opinions expressed in this article are not necessarily those held by Cross Rhythms. Any expressed views were accurate at the time of publishing but may or may not reflect the views of the individuals concerned at a later date.

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