Key Quotes - Housing

Key Quotes - Housing

A world perspective in bite-size chunks
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Last update: Sunday 24th February
 
The average property now takes nearly a week longer to sell than it did a year ago, according to an analysis of cities and major towns. Sellers typically face a 102-day wait to see their property snapped up, the report from Post Office Money found. This is six days longer than in 2017, when the average time period between a property going on the market and being sold or under offer was 96 days.
HousingThe Sentinel – 16th November 2018
 
Britain’s home-owners typically stay put for 19 years before moving, a report has found. And with stamp duty and other moving costs to consider, more than half (54%) of home-owners say they would rather improve their current property than move to a new one. Fitting new carpets, installing a new kitchen and landscaping the garden were the most common improvements for people to have made, Barclays Mortgages found.
HousingThe Sentinel – 31st October 2018
 
Top-band taxpayers in Westminster have contributed almost £400,000 to a voluntary scheme that invites them to pay extra council tax to fund help for rough sleepers.
HousingChurch Times – 9th November 2018
 
Two out of five people have had a disagreement with their neighbour, mainly over noise, parking or barking dogs, a new study reveals. Research by the Co-op found despite rows, almost a third of people say they get on better with their neighbours than they did five years ago. Two out of three had taken in parcels for a neighbour, half are happy to keep an eye on a house and a similar number know the name of someone they live next door to.
HousingThe Sentinel - 9 October 2018
 
Crisis says that nearly 160,000 British households are living in what it describes as the worst forms of homelessness - sleeping rough on the streets, in cars, tents, or shelters – and that, without radical action, that number will double in the next 25 years.
HousingChurch Times - 15th June 2018
 
A new village has opened to provide stable accommodation to homeless people as part of a campaign to eradicate the issue in Scotland. Social Bite Village launched yesterday in Granton, Edinburgh to provide a place to live and support for up to 20 people. The project, believed to be the first of its kind in the UK, is made up of 10 two-bed hurts with central hub where residents can socialise and admire views over the Firth of Forth.
HousingThe Sentinel - 18 May 2018
 
The Ministry of Defence has fallen “woefully short” with its plan to meet the housing needs of troops, a new report has claimed. The Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) has told the Government it runs the risk of driving people away from the armed forces unless a “coherent and detailed” housing strategy is developed.
HousingThe Sentinel, 31 May 2018
 
Up to half of the millennial generation could still be renting in their 40s and a third could be “retiree renters”, a report warns. The Resolution Foundation think-tank said that if home ownership growth in Britain follows the “weak pattern” of the 2000s, up to half of those born between 1981 and 2000 could be renting in their 40s and a third could still be renting by the time they are pension age.
HousingThe Sentinel - 17th April 2018
 
The number of people who have had to use church and community night shelters has doubled in the past four years, a new report suggests. Nearly 3000 people used night shelters last winter: a 53-per-cent rise on the numbers using them the previous winter, and double the number in 2012. The statistics were published by the Christian charity Housing Justice, which described them as “appalling”. Figures released by the Government’s spending watchdog, the Audit Office, this summer, showed a 134-per-cent rise in rough-sleepers since 2010, and a 60-per-cent rise in the number of families living in temporary accommodation.
HousingChurch Times – 15th December 2017
 
Government welfare reforms have contributed to a steep rise in rough-sleepers, long-term homelessness, and families living in temporary accommodation, the National Audit Office (NAO) has said. Its latest report on homelessness, published on Wednesday, states that the number of households living in temporary accommodation in England has increased by 60 per cent – to 77,240 – in the six years since March 2011. These households now contained 120,540 children: an increase of 73 per cent in the same period.
HousingChurch Times – 15th September 2017
 
The study Homelessness Projections: Core homelessness in Great Britain, by Professor Glen Bramley of Heriot-Watt University, for the charity Crisis, predicts that homelessness will rise by more than a quarter over the next ten years. The number of rough sleepers will rise by 76 per cent, it says, from 9,100 to 16,000, and to 40,100 by 2041. The report – based on panel surveys, statutory statistics, and academic studies – says that, at any one time across Britain in 2016 160,000 households were experiencing “core homelessness”, comprising “sofa surfing” (68,300), staying in hostels, shelters and refuges (42,200), being placed in unsuitable temporary accommodation (19,300), rough sleeping, staying in a car or tent, and squatting. The scale of core homelessness had increased in Britain by 33 per cent since 2011, with much of the increase coming from the use of “unsuitable” temporary accommodation.
HousingChurch Times – August 2017
 
More than a million private renters currently have to claim housing benefits to help cover the cost of their rent. Many of them are already in work, but owing to high rents and slow wage-growth, they cannot meet the cost of even the cheapest homes without additional support.
HousingChurch Times - June 30 2017
 
More than a million households in Britain are at the risk of becoming homeless by 2020, owing to the benefit freeze and the escalating cost of rents in the private sector, a report from Shelter suggests.
HousingChurch Times - June 30 2017
 
House prices have ‘stagnated’ as a Brexit squeeze on household finances and a slower pace of job creation continue to dampen demand. The Halifax house price index showed house prices between February and April were 0.2 per cent lower than in the previous three months, the first quarterly fall since November 2012. Halifax added house prices fell by 0.1 per cent between March and April and there has been ‘virtually no change’ in prices over the last three months.
HousingThe Sentinel - May 9th 2017
 
A report published by the Department of Communities and Local Government estimated there were 3,569 rough sleepers in England in the Autumn of last year. This figure, while likely to be lower than the real number of rough sleepers, is still a 30 per cent increase on the number of recorded rough sleepers in Autumn 2014, and almost twice the 1,768 recorded in 2010.
HousingThe Sentinel - March 22nd 2016
 
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