Dailey & Vincent - The Gospel Side Of Dailey & Vincent

Published Wednesday 17th July 2013
Dailey & Vincent - The Gospel Side Of Dailey & Vincent
Dailey & Vincent - The Gospel Side Of Dailey & Vincent

STYLE: Country
RATING 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10
OUR PRODUCT CODE: 142576-20957
LABEL: Rounder 1166191242
FORMAT: CD Album
ITEMS: 1

Reviewed by Dave Brassington

Dailey & Vincent are currently one of the hottest acts in bluegrass, with their popularity spilling over into the mainstream country scene. They are both veterans of the bluegrass scene, Jamie Dailey having spent nine years as lead singer with Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver, before linking up with Darrin Vincent who has played with such acts as Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder. For this new all gospel project, released and promoted by the Cracker Barrel chain store group in the USA, they have poured out their soul into a bunch of modern and contemporary gospel tunes. The catchy opener "Living In The Kingdom Of God" shows Jamie possess one of the most high ranging lead voices you are ever likely to hear. There is a good mix of contemporary songs like "Peace That Covers All The Pain", Cast Aside" and "Until At Last I'm Home" (partly written by Darrin) alongside some Southern gospel classics like "Noah Found Grace In The Eyes Of The Lord" and "The Fourth Man In The Fire". Add to these some quality renditions of country gospel evergreens like Willie Nelson's "Family Bible", Dolly Parton's "Welcome Home" and the song Carl Perkins wrote for his buddy Johnny Cash "Daddy Sang Bass", and you have a faultless selection. With a top quality backing band comprising fiddle, five-string banjo and bass Dailey & Vincent have broadened the sound of bluegrass by adding piano, some strings and even a little brass on "Daddy Sang Bass". Whilst some purists might jibe at this, personally I found the arrangements consistently effective. Hard to pick a favourite, but at a pinch I'd go for Dolly's patriotic piece "Welcome Home". A gem of an album.

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