Glenn Douglas Tubb - New Country Psalms

Published Friday 30th April 2010
Glenn Douglas Tubb - New Country Psalms
Glenn Douglas Tubb - New Country Psalms

STYLE: Country
RATING 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8
OUR PRODUCT CODE: 89495-16415
LABEL: Independent 1001
FORMAT: CD Album
ITEMS: 1
RRP: £10.00

Reviewed by Tom Lennie

This guy's quite a character. Nephew of the legendary Country Music Hall Of Fame artist, Ernest Tubb, Glenn had his first song recorded in 1952. Since then, he's had over 200 songs cut by the likes of Johnny Cash, Kitty Wells, George Jones, Tammy Wynette, Charlie Pride and Bob Dylan, to name just a few! He was one of the founding members of the Nashville Songwriters Association and for two decades was a staff writer for top publishers in Nashville, where he is still based. More recently, Glenn's been writing musical plays, novels and screenplays, as well as acting in movies! Oh, and by the way, he just got married earlier this year to Dottie Snow, a minister and gospel musician. If you're attracted to these 'New Country Psalms', it's one of only three albums Glenn Douglas has made. But don't be looking for 'new country'. For these songs are only 'new' in the sense that they've been freshly written by Tubb. Glenn Douglas' preferred style is strictly old school country and western; with a retro Hank Williams feel (he actually co-composed a Williams tune that the legend left unfinished when he died, though it doesn't appear here). These are wonderfully evocative country ditties, with appealing melodies and quirky lyrics, all with a gospel theme. "The Man Beyond The Blue" is my own favourite, but you'll also find a couple of tongue-in-cheek titles, such as "Give Satan An Inch (And He'll Be Your Ruler)"! or "Before He Was A Carpenter (He Was The Architect Who Made The Universe)". Trust me, most lyrics are cringe-free, though some are a tad clich├ęd, while there exists a predictability to some of the music here. The real attraction is Tubb's fine, fulsome vocals (not un-akin to those of above-noted Cash), aided by simple instrumental accompaniment. This intriguing set is worthy of the attention of country-gospel fans everywhere.

The opinions expressed in this article are not necessarily those held by Cross Rhythms. Any expressed views were accurate at the time of publishing but may or may not reflect the views of the individuals concerned at a later date.

Interested in reviewing music? Find out more here.

Be the first to comment on this article

We welcome your opinions but libellous and abusive comments are not allowed.












We are committed to protecting your privacy. By clicking 'Send comment' you consent to Cross Rhythms storing and processing your personal data. For more information about how we care for your data please see our privacy policy.